Sociology (SOCL)

SOCL 2015 - Introduction to Sociology (3 Credit Hours)

This course is designed to help the uninformed student to come to a realization of the role that sociology can play in his or her everyday life. We will look at the forces and practices that create our world socially and examine some of the reasons why and how individuals, groups and even governments do what they do.

Prerequisite(s): (MATH 0098 or DVMA 0098 or DVMA 0091 or MATH 0099 or DVMA 0099 or DVMA 0092 or MATH 1005 or MATH 1015 or MATH 1500 or ACT Math with a score of 17 or COMPASS Algebra with a score of 30 or ACCUPLACER Elementary Algebra with a score of 065 or ACCUPLACER College Level Math with a score of 020) and (ENGL 0098 or DVEN 0098 or DVEN 0091 or ENGL 0099 or DVEN 0099 or DVEN 0092 or ENGL 1015 or ACT English with a score of 17 or COMPASS English with a score of 39 or ACCUPLACER Sentence Skills with a score of 060)

(3/0/3)

SOCL 2120 - Social Problems (3 Credit Hours)

A course designed to provide an examination of the major social problems in society with an emphasis on how these problems are interrelated and the role of society in their creation and perpetuation.

Prerequisite(s): SOCL 2015

(3/0/3)

SOCL 2220 - Marriage and Family (3 Credit Hours)

This course interweaves social science and the humanities to examine diverse family forms. Major emphasis is placed on a macrostructural analysis of families, both historically and in the present. We will examine how families and family members are affected by differences in race, gender, social class, sexuality, and global locations. In turn, special attention will be given to transnational families and the feminization of migration to illustrate how the global is increasingly local today.

Prerequisite(s): None

(3/0/3)

SOCL 2420 - Stratification and Inequality (3 Credit Hours)

Stratification refers to systematic social inequality in the access of opportunities, resources, and rewards. It involves the uneven distribution of people across social categories based upon achieved and ascribed characteristics. Human societies differ greatly in the extent of stratification present within them. This course focuses on social stratification in the United States. We will address how stratification has developed to its present state in the U.S. and question why members of certain groups advance while others do not.

Prerequisite(s): None

(3/0/3)